the present moment

We’ve been posting a lot of journal entries and photos from the beginning of the trip – and realized that a bit of a peek into the here and now might be a good idea – and hopefully interesting.  This morning finds us sipping tea in a large round arena – perhaps 70′ in diameter – solidly built of cinder blocks below and a metal panels above – the ground is sand, which was lovely for our tent and for the ponies legs – and we really appreciated the wind and noise block it provided.  Our hosts are Mexican, with beautiful horses of their own – and although they warned us that the neighbor might play loud music for a few hours last night, we didn’t hear a thing!

The nights are cold, but our tent and sleeping bags keep us toasty when we camp, and often we have been invited into people’s homes (and fed and showered and laundered and entertained into the bargain).  Last night hot burgers and cold pepsi were delivered to our tent – and a bale of hay for the ponies.  Today we press on to Corcoran – where we hope to do a bit of a re-supply, as we’re out of porridge and horse food, and very low on denatured alcohol…

We are growing more accustomed to this strange and haunted valley – the immensity and gridness of it all.  We are moving slowly, 5-7 miles a day of late, because Jesse James has a strained muscle in his left hip and we’re not asking him to carry anything or anyone while he has time to heal.  We count it a great blessing when someone is willing to transport gear for the day, because that means Sea can ride Cowgirl and pony Jesse, rather than trudge down the side of the road, leading them both.

Gryph was given a spectacular and well-worn pair of chinks two days ago, a blessing for her chafed knees (and they look So cool!).  We made a tack change for Cowgirl, packing her on an old (1904) McClellan cavalry saddle rather than a sawbuck – so we’re back on the learning curve re: packing, but at least we have the principles down and we only had to repack once yesterday – before we’d even left the yard.  We’d toyed with the idea of gradually transferring over to all McClellans, until Gryph put it on Finehorn and sat in it.  The slot down the center of the saddle (to allow air and lack of pressure on the horses’ spine) seems to have been specifically designed for men – which makes sense as there were no women in the cavalry in 1904 – we have yet to meet a man who considers it a problem (or a woman who considers it ridable!)

It is strange to realize that so many of you are busy preparing for Christmas – and to wonder where that day will find the 5 of us.  Occasionally we pass some reminder, a huge Santa hat on a John Deere tractor – or Christmas lights decorating a house we see across the fields.  Nothing to do with us hobos – who ride along each day wondering if there will be room for us to stop for the night and throw down our bedrolls in a barn (we don’t even knock at the Inn ;-).

Now that we are finally getting the blog up and running, we find it a great encouragement when someone decides to “follow” us – and/or makes a comment (which lets us know that we’re being read!)  Blessings on you all  — as we have been incredibly blessed thus far on this journey, by the love of friends and family and the kindness of the wonderful people we have met and are meeting along the way.  Our hearts are filled with gratitude.

About Gryph Rhydr

Sea G Rhydr and her trusty steeds, Jesse James and Finehorn - embarking on a grand adventure to cross America.
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8 Responses to the present moment

  1. Dirk & Jen Gieser says:

    Thanks for the real time update. We booked your lodging for your unreal time in February this morning.

  2. Shery Justice says:

    Horses look great! Sorry you are on foot again.

  3. Mary Reed says:

    The three horse angels.

  4. Terry says:

    Well Larry and Terry are still following you from Tranquillity.
    You need to post what Post Office you will be at next. Like what
    date you will be close to what towns.
    In case there are readers that want to send things to you.
    Hope Jes’s Hip is doing better.

  5. Terry says:

    Darn pretty bad when I have to go back and correct my own email addy.
    Terry
    Tranquillity,Ca

  6. jennifer orange says:

    Good afternoon girls. I hope this finds you comfortable in your travels. I do my best to check in on you both periodically, to read and see the wonderful pictures and postings. Go with Gods blessing each day of your travels
    Jennifer, Hanford

  7. horse sence says:

    i think you wemon are some worthless hypocrites with a bad out look on everyone but your selves. you complaine how other other people miss treat there horses and dont care for them. but really who are the ladys that have been on this so called adveture for a lil under three month and have already crippled two of there trusty steeds. someone cuts them a break and sells them a new horse for way under price ( touchdown cowgirl ) and all i see you ladies post is complants. you are the ones that dont have shelter for your horses or even food for that matter. pictures of a horse so thirsty in the hot bakersfeild weather that it is croutching and bowing like iv never seen a horse croutch before just for a sip of water out of a concret drainage, very dangerous melt shoes on concret. But wait do you ladys even care for your horses enough to put shoes on there horses that are forced to walk several miles on there treck across america every day. thats what i thought. sorry to harsh you ladys so bad but thats what happens to worthless hypocrites.

    • Linda Dean says:

      and are you yourself a long rider? If so, what is your technique? Any pointers, suggestions? Be positive about it. Negativity just breeds more of it. If you were near Bakersfield, why werent you there with a 350 gallon water jug? If your werent, and had friends there, why didnt you call and ask them to help them? Bakersfield does have water, and they did get help. hush yourself now, and go take a nap.

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